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Public Land: It's What Sets The American West Apart

November 30, 2022

"Wind River Mountains, Nebraska Territory," 1862, an oil painting by Albert Bierstadt
Writer Dave Marston discusses what he's thankful for as we move from one year to the next Answer: public lands and the wonder they inspire
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How Do We Prevent Wild Greater Yellowstone from Unraveling?

November 29, 2022

Pronghorn migration in Greater Yellowstone
Special report: What can be done to save the Yellowstone ecosystem? If we're serious and want to have a reason for hope, here are several big ideas for how to do it
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Why 'Yellowstone' Rancher John Dutton Says 'Progress' Is Destroying The Wild Rural West

October 27, 2022

The "balance" between private land development and conservation is landing hard on some of America's most famous wildlife populations
The only way Greater Yellowstone, America's most iconic wildlife ecosystem, stands a chance of being saved is if there's a game plan. Glaringly, none now exists
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In Many Mountain Towns, Affordable Shelter Is An Elusive Holy Grail

October 17, 2022

The worker struggles in Durango are present in many Western mountain towns
When no home is affordable, where do longtime locals and essential workers live? How is the problem fixed when 'the free market' fails?
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Citizen Groundswell Rises Up To Keep A Montana Lake Quaint

October 7, 2022

Would an industrial strength outdoor recreation resort 'enhance' Holland Lake?
Utah outdoor adventure company, known for running ski resorts, seeks Forest Service permission to dramatically expand human footprint on Holland Lake 
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Cowboying Up Doesn’t Mean You Can’t Be Vulnerable

March 28, 2022

Even tough dudes don't want to be lonesome cowpokes
Western men and women often evince the "I don't need nobody to care for me" look but all they really want is to feel connection. A new column about toughness by psychotherapist Timothy Tate
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It Started With A Pilgrimage To Wonderland

March 23, 2022

A black bear jam more than half a century ago in Yellowstone
In the first of a three-part series, "Reflections on a Changed and Changing Yellowstone," writer Earle F. Layser remembers his first visit to America's first national park 75 years ago compared to today
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Wherever You Find Fun Outside, Crazy Creek Has Your Back Covered

March 23, 2022

The camp chair of choice for 35 years
Red Lodge, Montana-based maker of portable chairs, a favorite of active outdoorspeople in the Rockies, is also devoted to protecting the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem
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How Much Is Enough? (To Save Or Destroy A World-Class Ecosystem?)

March 13, 2022

How much is enough to save or destroy an ecosystem
New ongoing MoJo series comes at time of record visitation to Yellowstone and Jackson Hole, crowded rivers, exploding development pressure, surging outdoor recreation and climate change
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Prominent Scientists Push Back Against Delisting Grizzly Bears: Op-Ed

January 13, 2022

Grizzly 399 and one of her recent cubs
When it comes to assessing biological recovery of grizzlies, who is better informed—people who study wildlife for a living or governors and legislators who dislike grizzlies and wolves?
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Twilight Of The Yellowstone Winterkeepers

December 24, 2021 // Yellowstone

Portrait of Steven Fuller by Neal Herbert/National Park Service
After nearly 50 years of solitude, Steven Fuller is a living legend in Yellowstone and an endangered 21st-century icon
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Scientists Say Gianforte's Anti-Wolf, Anti-Grizzly Policies In Montana Have No Scientific Basis

October 2, 2021 // Wildlife, Wolves, Yellowstone

Wolves and grizzlies target of Montana's anti-predator laws
Prominent group of wildlife professionals with 1,500 years of experience condemn Montana's new laws targeting wolves. Already pups from popular Yellowstone wolf pack have been killed
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Forest Service "Debacle" In Black Hills Must Not Be Repeated Elsewhere

September 22, 2021 // Forest Service, Logging

What thinning the forest to save it looks like in South Dakota
Former second in command of US Forest Service questions agency's accelerated push to thin forests and log big trees in response to fire, insects and climate change. Felling forests, Jim Furnish says, is not a strategy to save them
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Wildness Ought To Make Us All The Wiser

August 16, 2021

Imagine Greater Yellowstone if there were no grizzlies
We crave and need contact with nature but, as Joseph Scalia writes in this essay, technology and human numbers are shrinking back the feel of wild places. That's why, he says, we need to protect more of them
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